Topic 2

Life Science and Microgravity

 6 October 2020 16:30 - 19:00 CET

Moon, Mars here we come!

Houston, we need a scientist! After millions of years of evolution, the human body has fully adapted to terrestrial conditions. This also means that many changes arise when astronauts spend time in space conditions, and it teaches us a lot about our physiology.
Space is also more than just weightlessness and radiation. It presents many challenges to sustain life: confinement, isolation, nutrition, circadian rhythm, heavy workload, etc. It is also necessary to develop new life support systems that do not rely on frequent resupplies to provide oxygen, water, and food. All these challenges need to be addressed to prepare future interplanetary missions to the Moon and Mars.

  • What happens to the human body in microgravity?

  • Before going to Mars, how to increase radiation resistance in astronauts?

  • Rotifers in space, what can we learn from them?

  • Supporting life in space: Bacterial production of Oxygen

Speakers

What happens to the human body in microgravity?

Vladimir Pletser

Director of Space Training Operations, Blue Abyss

Degrees in Mechanical Engineering, M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Physics (UCLouvain)

Previously:

Visiting Professor, Centre for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing,supporting microgravity research for parabolic flights and Chinese Space Station;

Senior Physicist – Engineer for 30 years at ESA-ESTEC, developing microgravity payloads (Spacelab,ISS) and responsible of parabolic flight programme (7350 parabolas, 39h30m of 0g, equivalent to 26 Earth orbits).

Before going to Mars, how to increase radiation resistance in astronauts

Bjorn Baselet

Scientific Collaborator, SCK CEN

Bjorn Baselet obtained his MSc in Biomedical Sciences at the Hasselt University in 2013. Afterwards he performed a joint PhD in the field of vascular problems after radiation exposure at UCL and SCK CEN. From 2017 onwards, Bjorn joined the Radiobiology Unit of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN) where he is coordinating different ESA funded space biology projects, thereby investigating the impact of (simulated) space conditions on human health.

Supporting life in space: Bacterial production

of Oxygen

 

Baptiste Leroy

Assistant professor - U Mons

Baptiste Leroy is studying bacterial metabolism at the University of Mons. He specialised recently in the analysis of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria and carbon metabolism in purple bacteria. His activities currently englobe fundamental research through omics and molecular analyses as well as terrestrial application of bioprocesses.

Sponsors

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